So as not to forget. How to open a pomegranate (the right way)!

Sometimes I run across instructions for doing something on the Internet that are so wonderfully easy and sensible, I just want to do it that way each time.  In the case of opening pomegranates, there are a lot of instructions out there but I had not found any good ones until recently.  I tested those new instructions, found them to be everything as represented, then promptly lost them.  Finding them again was no easy task.  So I won’t lose them again, I have decided to embed the video here for your reference as well.  Enjoy!

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iHbSzM63Hs]

Mamas, Don’t Let Your Doggies (or Kitties) Grow Up on Commercial Pet Food….

About two years before I met my beloved little poodle, Butch, my cat passed away at the age of seventeen. A ripe old age many may say, but after he died of kidney failure, I had a few years to reflect on why there was no reason he might not have lived many more healthy years had I only known then what I know now about diet and nutrition.

I have since concluded that I was a colossal idiot about how and what I fed my dear Mr. Cat, unwittingly trusting the veterinary establishment to his detriment and slowly killing him with chronic dehydration. You see? I bought the bag.

My vet convinced me it was the good stuff. Healthier for him than the raw eggs, cheese, and occasional gecko he had been living on while he was a stray. In retrospect, however, I now believe he’d have been better off hunting his own. The scientifically-formulated bags of grain and crap we buy aren’t right for any cat or dog however much they may seem to crave it and however much you may pay for it.

Our pet animals simply cannot take in enough water by drinking straight water to compensate for what they need to take in as water content of their food. The grains and other fillers used are indigestible by carnivores and are the source of allergies and auto-immune dysfunction in pets aplenty.

Cats, especially, can only gain access to dietary carbohydrates by consuming them in the gut of prey which actually produce enzymes needed to break these macronutrients down into their various chemical components. Cats’ guts cannot break down carbs at all. Dogs only have limited access to those enzymes.

So why are grains in there? Because the government subsidizes their production, meaning grain is way cheaper than meat, and those fillers make it seem like our animals are eating enough though it’s really stuff their bodies can’t even use. I also suspect, as with people, they also make crap food more palatable—like kitty candy.

And Mr. Cat? Year after year of UTIs? “He’s a neutered male and they’re prone to those.” “Crystals” in his urine? “Let’s switch him to a special, low mineral ‘therapeutic’ diet.” Two years of subcutaneous saline injections? “He’s getting older. It happens. We don’t know why.”

And they don’t know why. Nutrition is about as well-understood by vets as by human doctors. (Read: not at all.)

So when I got my Butch and later fostered a kitten, Gary, I learned about feeding raw. It’s a huge pain, I will grant you, so when I don’t have the time to manage it, I at least feed organic, grain-free canned or organic frozen raw medallions from a reputable source and then supplement with raw meat, skin, bones, fat, and organs as often as I can.

If not raw feeding, just be sure the first two to five ingredients on the canned food or frozen medallions for both cats and dogs are non-pork meat. Not “by-products.” Meat. There also ideally should be a good balance between muscle, skin, bones, and organs.

Should you decide to “go raw,” do your research to learn how and then know this: vets freak out at the idea of feeding bones, even to carnivores, because they see so many critters needing surgery to remove them. Most surgical cases involve COOKED bones, however, not raw.

And pets need to chew raw, flexible poultry bones and connective tissue to keep their jaws and teeth strong. Additionally, bones supply much needed collagen, calcium, magnesium, and other vital minerals to your pets’ diet the way nature normally does—not as an additive. To be sure, your pets’ stomach acid is plenty strong enough to digest soft raw bones long before those bones enter the intestine.

Please note: I do specifically recommend raw poultry bones over raw bones of beef and other large animal. I personally fear that raw bones of larger animals may be more problematic than bones of fowl especially for small dogs, like mine, and domestic cats. I also avoid small, long bones, like poultry ribs, as discussed below.

Cooked bones of all kinds, unlike raw bones, splinter and are easily capable of puncturing esophagi, stomachs and, surviving the stomach, your pets’ delicate intestines. Those bones also lose vital collagen as they are heated. In short, do NOT cook any bones you feed your carnivore!

Also, know your pet. If he’s a gobbler, you may want to grind the bones and meat to a very fine, even consistency before feeding or skip the bones altogether. My dog is a chewer so I feel better about his eating raw bones as he carefully breaks them up with his teeth before swallowing. And, knowing my dog could just as soon choke on dry food, I’ve chosen to feed him the raw and NOT the definitely unhealthful dry.

(The bottom line is you are just going to have to make your own call on the risk-benefit of feeding bones, Cupcake.)

Organ meat is another essential part of a healthful diet for your carnivore as it is rich in needed vitamins and enzymes as well. For goodness’ sake, don’t toss that bag of giblets even if you aren’t into the delights of chicken liver and gizzards. Feed them to your cats and dogs. They will think you are the best!

I even snip chicken, duck, and turkey necks into bite-sized, single vertebrae disks with kitchen shears and disjoint wings for my nine-pound doggie. (I used to give him the whole thing, but then he started “saving” his raw chicken parts between the sofa cushions for later snacking. Mom was not happy. Smaller bits can be doled out to him until he finishes and the rest kept for later.)

The next objection typically raised is about salmonella, e coli, and other crap the establishment wants us to believe is lurking on every bit of raw food ever purchased. My responses are the following:

First, your sweet little doggies and kitties have evolved over eons with gastrointestinal biochemistry specifically designed to kill such critters on contact. If you animal is reasonably healthy, he can handle it! (Read stories of stray pups who make their living on road kill and live to tell, if you don’t believe me….)

Second, feed good quality, organic, pastured meat, if you can. The scariest germs seem to be found on sickly, feedlot, antibiotic-enhanced, Franken-livestock meats. Avoid them. Always. For you too.

Third, cost. Yup. Feeding your animal well and raw may cost you a bit of time or money. That being said, backs and organ meat come free with every whole chicken you plan to cut up anyway. I don’t feed rib bones to my pup because I feel that would just be asking for a medical emergency, but I do skin and trim the back and, between that and the giblet packet, feed him rather well for a two to three days.

My butcher even has been known to give me huge quantities of scrap turkey meat and bones around the holidays—free for the asking. Frankly, it took a little while to trim and pack those “free” scraps, but after re-freezing the gallon bags of meat, my babies ate raw for weeks. You will also find that real meat and fat fills your pet up sooner, and he will eat less in turn. See? Cost-effective.

Finally, practice good sanitation when raw feeding. This includes keeping your pet’s raw feed bowl super clean and certainly washing it following contact with raw meat. Also, be sure to disinfect the areas of the floor and/or kennel where your pet will undoubtedly drag his raw meat “prey” before eating it.

I also cover or bag and refrigerate or freeze meat I don’t plan on feeding within a few hours. Then I take the meat out and allow to warm to room temperature before presenting it to my critter. Chilled food just doesn’t have as much flavor.

As much as I believe in the safety of raw feeding, I do make it a practice to supervise my animal when he eats raw just in case he runs into trouble or decides to wander off with a bit of raw “treasure.” It’s also rather entertaining to see the primal behavior which sometimes surfaces in my sweet, innocent, tame little friend in the presence of raw food. He may shake it, throw it in the air, or pounce on it (as my foster cat, Gary, does). They know it’s prey, people.

Raw food is not just nutritionally necessary from time-to-time, but our animals know the difference between real food and the normal nonsense we feed them in lieu of what they really want to eat. Help them and their health by feeding them they way they need and not the way the industrial food complex would have us believe we should!

Rawr!

Best Cold Remedy Soup, Yet….

Like many of you this time of year (and hereafter), I was feeling really run down with a sore throat and general yuck. Knowing I would have to see this cold through on my own, I instantly searched the Internet for a soup recipe that could pull me through the next few days while laid up with what seemed like impending doom. I found this: “Mom’s Cold-Season Chicken Soup” at SimplyRecipes.com.

It looked like a recipe I could handle, even at half-power, so, now, it was just a race against time. And, of course, there would have to be a few modifications….

I drove to my local Whole Foods as fast as my feverish brain could manage to hunt down the ingredients for the soup recipe but not for the recommended homemade chicken stock. (I did NOT have that kind of time!) Instead, I substituted Kitchen Basics (Unsalted) Chicken Stock in a Tetrapak. For the fat, I would dip into the lard I rendered about a week earlier.

Organic vegetables were my call both for flavor and potency, and an organic French bread baguette, as well. Then I made a few changes—Cajun seasoning instead of “poultry seasoning” (whatever that is), and for the bread, a very strong garlic butter using, in my case, pastured butter and organic garlic.

I started chopping as soon as my feet hit the kitchen tile. Luckily, for Sicko over here, there was no mincing called for—just a rough dice—so the veggie prep was quick, and there was still time to pull my garlic butter and bread together.

To make the garlic bread, you just cut a baguette into quarters and for each quarter prepare the following: in a chopper or small food processor, grind two cloves (or one big one) of garlic; when minced, add two tablespoons of cold butter cut into eight bits then pulse the butter and garlic until the mixture sticks to the side of the bowl. Split your baguette lengthwise along the side, spread the garlic butter on each half of the bread. Preheat the oven to 350°.

Now that I was through with prep, it was time to start the sauté.

To begin with, I used way more than a tablespoon of fat for the veggies—more like four. While the veggies were cooking down, I added the seasonings as instructed. Here, however, I doubled the crushed red pepper flakes. (Hey, Sunshine, this cold isn’t going to get over itself!)

At the point I added the stock to the veggies, I also popped my quarter baguette into the oven for about 10 minutes or so until it was hot but not brown. You can toast either closed or open-faced. Mercifully, once the bread was done it was time to serve the soup, as well.

Now this recipe makes about three quarts of soup, and I recommend eating about 1 quart and one quarter loaf at a sitting. Afterward, you will reek of garlic, and you may experience a slight tingling of the mucosal membranes—but hey, that just means it’s working.

So if you are the only one who is sick or the soup works immediately, why not freeze the rest of the French bread and pour the soup into quart-sized containers and freeze it too? Then you can heat and eat the soup and all you have to do is make a new batch of garlic butter for the bread. I did this and it’s just as effective as new!

Feel better the delicious way, while keeping vampires at bay, with this souped-up Mom’s Cold-Season Chicken Soup.

Rawr!

Fun Friday Recommended Reads

Happy Friday! Here’s a round-up of interesting stuff for you to read while suffering through extremes in temperature or moisture-levels:

Could eating poo-burgers save the Earth?,” Jess Zimmerman, June 17, 2011, Grist.org.

Farm pork not going anywhere,” Tom Laskawy, June 15, 2011, Grist.org.

How pasta became the world’s favourite food ,” Caroline McClatchy, June 15, 2011, BBC.co.uk.

The Scariest Chart About Seafood You’ll See This Year,” Daniel Fromson, June 14, 2011, TheAtlantic.com.

Buy a half-gallon of sugar water at KFC, give a dollar to diabetes research,” Jess Zimmerman, June 14, 2011, Grist.org.

Cheap food: Not what’s for dinner anymore?,” Tom Philpott, June 10, 2011, Grist.org.

Organic Farmers v. Monsanto,” June 10, 2011, SlowFoodUSA.org.

Drought gardening: How will horticulturists cope?,” June 8, 2011, BBC.co.uk.

E. coli: Germany says worst of illness is over,” June 8, 2011, BBC.co.uk.

http://www.grist.org/food/2011-06-07-contaminated-compost-toxins-might-lurk-in-that-bag-youre-buying,” Tom Laskawy, June 7, 2011, Grist.org.

Chef Secrets: Extra Pickle Juice, Please,” James Mulcahy, Zagat.com.

Fun Friday Recommended Reads

Happy Friday! Here’s a round-up of interesting stuff for you to read while waiting for your sunburn to finish peeling:

The Deli Renaissance,” Vanessa Barrington, June 3, 2011, CivilEats.com.

Mushroom hunting and banjo pickin’ in the Ozarks ,”Daniel Klein, June 2, 2011, Grist.org.

Down with healthy school lunches, says House GOP ,” Tom Laskawy, June 1, 2011, Grist.org.

GROWing a movement,” Vicky Rateau, June 1, 2011, CivilEats.com.

European food outbreak soars; mystery deepens,” AP, June 1, 2011, Nola.com.

In Search of the Perfect Sear, Vol. 1: The Hot Pan ,” Chris Morocco, June 1, 2011, BonAppetit.com.

Kentucky Raw Milk Enthusiasts Live Out Constitutional Freedoms,” Kimberly Hartke, June 1, 2011, HartkeisOnline.com.

Slow Food Gets Prepared by Slow Families,” Sara Tetreault, May 31, 2011, GoGingham.com.

Chasing Chiles: place-based foods & climate change,” April 8, 2011, SlowFoodUSA.com.

Fun Friday Recommended Reads

Happy Friday! Here’s a round-up of interesting stuff for you to read while hanging out in the Nicholas Pavilion of the PGA Regions Tradition golf tournament at Shoal Creek Country this weekend:

Girl Scouts censor Facebook criticism of palm oil in cookies,” Glenn Hurowitz, May 5, 2011, Grist.org.

Forget About Horses: A Bourbon Picking Guide for Derby Day, and Every Day,” Tony Sachs, May 6, 2011, HuffingtonPost.com.

How Food Explains the World,” Joshua Keating, May/June 2011, ForeignPolicy.com.

Bad seeds: A plan to phase out the $5 billion in ‘direct payment’ agricultural subsidies,” Jake Caldwell, May 4, 2011, Grist.org.

Strawberry grower shows how to make a profit without poisons ,” ONEARTH, April 26, 2011, Grist.org.

Do You Know How Many Genetically Modified Foods You’re Eating? 8 to Pay Attention To ,” Lisa Gosselin, April 25, 2011, EatingWell.com.

Gary Taubes’ sugar article makes an excellent case for diversifying agriculture,” Tom Philpott, April 22, 2011, Grist.org.

Worried about fake food dyes? 4 tips to avoid them,” Brierly Wright, April 1, 2011, EatingWell.com.

Bees feed us: now they need our help,” The Slow Food USA Blog, March 2, 2011, SlowFoodUSA.org.

Fun Friday Recommended Reads

Happy Friday! Here’s a round-up of interesting stuff for you to read while bellying up to the crawfish table, raising the third glass in your wine flight, or camping out to see the big Kid Rock show:

Food Trucks Rolling Into (Dallas) Arts District,” Julie Tam, MSN.com.

Is Walmart our best hope for food policy reform?,” Tom Philpott, April 29, 2011, Grist.org.

Coca-Cola adds BPA to list of ways it doesn’t care about your health,” Christopher Mims, April 29, 2011, Grist.org.

Taco Bell may sue Alabama law firm over dropped beef case,” Fox News, April 26, 2011, NYPost.com.

Give a cluck: Ask Umbra on secret backyard chickens,” Ask Umbra, April 28, 2011, Grist.org.

Students fight to save innovative garden-based public school in Detroit,” Tom Philpott, April 26, 2011, Grist.org.

The Latest Food Marketing Trend: Fake Authenticity,” Jane Black, April 25, 2011, TheAtlantic.com.

Nourish launches video encyclopedia,” April 25, 2011, SlowFoodUSA.org.

Why Is Damning New Evidence About Monsanto’s Most Widely Used Herbicide Being Silenced?,” Jill Richardson, April 25, 2011, Alternet.org.

James Lewis Set to Open Restaurant Butcher Shop Vittoria Macelleria,” Jason Horn, April 20, 2011, MagicCityPost.com.

VitalChoice.com–Better than Fresh When It Comes to Fish (Really!)

The Internet is rife with stories about the high mercury levels found in fresh and canned tuna, including sushi-grade and ahi-grade tuna steaks found at otherwise fabulous restaurants. And while concerns about high levels of heavy metals in tuna and other large predator fish mount, the FDA hasn’t exactly done a great job alerting consumers about such dangerous levels of heavy metals, refusing even to require notices of the type you see on menus serving raw or undercooked eggs, oysters, meat, etc.

Add that to concerns that “Big Tuna’s” use of nets in fishing operations is killing large numbers of dolphin bystanders, and it’s enough to turn you completely off of an otherwise wonderful source of healthy fats and protein. So what are you to do the next time you want your tasty Omega-3 fix? VitalChoice.com.

My husband found Vital Choice as part of his effort to increase the amount of fish in our diet, particularly as we had recently moved inland away from the abundant supplies of seafood to which we had grown accustomed. Endorsed by such luminaries and pioneers of the holistic and complementary medical movement as Andrew Weil , M.D., Nicholas Perricone, M.D., and Stephen Sinatra, M.D., Vital Choice’s wild, line-caught tuna and salmon ranks at the very top compared with fish sold anywhere else for low mercury content and sustainable fishing practices.

And I can tell you, all of the Vital Choice seafood I have tried are delicious both in canned and frozen form. Check out other products too, such as Omega-3 rich fish oil capsules, including salmon and krill oil, as well as minimally-processed canned mackerel and sardines. There is also ample literature and many white papers available through their website to help you learn why the practices of Vital Choice and its partners are different from many other purveyors of fresh and canned fish.

Bon appetite!

N.B. I have been enjoying Vital Choice seafood for more than two years now, fully-endorse the company, and stand by everything I have said about them in this post. My family and I have been nothing but impressed by every aspect of our interaction with the company from their ability to successfully deliver as promised (notwithstanding our hot summer weather) to the taste of the seafood itself. In the interest of full-disclosure, however, I have also recently become an marketing affiliate of the company, which provides income to this website for sales of its various products.

Yet another reason to cook your own food….

As if quality control, choice of ingredients and recipe, and cost savings weren’t enough, Men’s Health editors have given us yet another reason ’tis better to cook your own. The article, “The Most Dangerous Thing You’ll Do All Day,” reveals “that people who sit for most of the day are 54 percent more likely to die of heart attacks,” than those who don’t.

It turns out this information is old news, having been confirmed by study after study beginning in 1953. The question of whether to sit or not to sit is relevant whether you smoke or don’t and regardless of whether or how much you exercise. Peter Katzmarzyk, the lead researcher on a recent study conducted by the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, said, “Sitting is an independent risk factor,” although no researcher has yet to figure out why.

Not only will you improve your heart health with standing more, you will also help relieve your lower back pain, trim your waistline, and strengthen your abs. And it’s something you can do just about anywhere.

That being said, how can you cram more standing into your already jam-packed schedule? One way is cooking your own meals or those of your family. And for goodness sake, get that stool out of your kitchen and make cooking a group activity in order to get your young ‘uns off their buns as well!